The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson
ĽOvert Obstruction of Congress

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Domestic Intelligence
Harper's Weekly, September 21, 1867, page 595

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Southern Reconstruction
President Johnson issued on September 7 a new proclamation of amnesty. After a lengthy preamble the document recites that the full pardon described in the proclamation of May 29, 1865, shall be extended to all persons having participated in the late rebellion, with the restoration of all privileges, immunities, and rights of property, except as to property with regard to slaves, and except in cases of legal proceedings under the laws of the United States, on condition that such persons shall take an oath of allegiance, which oath is duly described. The chief or pretended chief executive officers of the late Confederacy, all heads of departments of the Confederate Government, all agents thereof in foreign States and countries, all having held military rank or title above the grade of Brigadier-General, or naval rank or title above that of Captain, all Governors of States, all persons having treated otherwise than as lawful prisoners of war persons in the military or naval service of the United States, and all persons, who were engaged, either directly or indirectly, in the assassination of the late President are debarred from profiting by the amnesty. This proclamation really affects only about 400 persons in all the South; relieves only one-fourth of these; and was issued only for political effect.


Articles Related to Overt Obstruction of Congress:
Congress
February 2, 1867, page 67
February 16, 1867, page 99
March 16, 1867, page 163


How Long?
June 29, 1867, page 402


Reconstruction and Obstruction
July 6, 1867, page 418


The Summer Session
July 6, 1867, page 418


The Fortieth Congress
July 17, 1867, page 467


Thanks to the District Commanders
July 27, 1867, page 467


Impeachment Postponed
July 27, 1867, page 467


A Desperate Man
August 13, 1867, page 546


The Secretary of War
August 24, 1867, page 530


Samson Agonistes at Washington (cartoon)
August 24, 1867, page 544


The Stanton Imbroglio (illustrated satire)
August 24, 1867, page 542


Secretary Grant
August 31, 1867, page 546


Southern Reconstruction
August 31, 1867, page 547


The Political Situation
September 7, 1867, page 562


General Thomas
September 7, 1867, page 563


Southern Reconstruction
September 7, 1867, page 563


The General and the President
September 14, 1867, page 578


General Sickles Also
September 14, 1867, page 579


Southern Reconstruction
September 21, 1867, page 595


The President’s Intentions
September 28, 1867, page 610


Impeachment
October 5, 1867, page 626


The Main Question
October 5, 1867, pages 626-627


Suspension during Impeachment
October 19, 1867, page 658


"Disregarding" The Law
November 2, 1867, page 691


Impeachment
December 14, 1867, page 786


General Grant’s Testimony
December 14, 1867, page 786


The President’s Message
December 14, 1867, page 787


General Grant’s Letter
January 1, 1868, page 2


Secretary Stanton’s Restoration
January 25, 1868, page 51


Reconstruction Measures
January 25, 1868, page 51


The President, Mr. Stanton and General Grant
February 1, 1868, page 66


Romeo (Seward) to Mercutio (Johnson) (cartoon)
February 1, 1868, page 76


The War Office
February 1, 1868, page 77


Secretary’s Room in the War Department (illus)
February 1, 1868, page 77


The New Reconstruction Bill
February 8, 1868, page 83

 

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